Industry

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    The North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) is an industry classification system developed by the statistical agencies of Canada, Mexico and the United States. balanced scorecard is able to recognize the multiple dimensions of performance.

North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) 2007 Canada (abbreviated version)

The North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) is an industry classification system developed by the statistical agencies of Canada, Mexico and the United States.

At the highest level, the NAICS divides the economy into 20 sectors. At lower levels, it further distinguishes the different economic activities in which businesses are engaged. We use the list below to rank blogs accordingly.

11

Agriculture, Forestry, Fishing and Hunting

53

Real Estate and Rental and Leasing

21

Mining, Quarrying, and Oil and Gas Extraction

54

Professional, Scientific and Technical Services

22

Utilities

55

Management of Companies and Enterprises

23

Construction

56

Administrative and Support, Waste Management and Remediation Services

31-33

Manufacturing

61

Educational Services

41

Wholesale Trade

62

Health Care and Social Assistance

44-45

Retail Trade

71

Arts, Entertainment and Recreation

48-49

Transportation and Warehousing

72

Accommodation and Food Services

51

Information and Cultural Industries

81

Other Services (except Public Administration)

52

Finance and Insurance

91

Public Administration

Here you can find a longer introduction of the NAICS

    “There will be a few large and complex companies and enterprises whose activities may be spread over the different sectors of NAICS, in such a way that classifying them to one sector will misrepresent the range of their activities. However, in general, a larger proportion of the activities of each complex company and enterprise is more likely to fall within the sector, subsector and industry group levels of the classification than within the industry levels. Hence, the higher levels of the classification are more suitable for the classification of companies and enterprises than are the lower levels. It should also be kept in mind that when businesses are composed of establishments belonging to different NAICS industries, their company- and enterprise-level data will show a different industrial distribution, when classified to NAICS, than will their establishment-level data, and the data will not be directly comparable…”